In California − the World’s seventh largest economy and a state that comprises roughly 40 million people − state lawmakers have passed a new law that aims to protect the privacy of consumers, and specifically details new notice requirements for those businesses that are collecting data from consumers on the web or even through conventional means at their brick-and-mortar locations.

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Background
In a service-based economy, many industrial and consumer products are manufactured and sold through trademark licensing arrangements. Under these types of contractual agreements, the owner of the trademark licenses its brand name or mark to another company in exchange for a licensing fee. The authorized user of the trademark then has a contractual right to manufacture and sell the goods bearing the trademark. However, in some circumstances, the mere act of licensing the trademark to a manufacturer of a product for a fee can expose the licensor to a product liability claim under the Apparent Manufacturers Doctrine (AMD).

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Clients who are first introduced to the concept of strict liability in the context of a product liability lawsuit are often shocked to learn they can be held liable for a product defect simply because they sold the defective product. The first question we always hear in these situations is “How can I be held liable if I did not have any involvement in the decisions that went into how the product was designed or built?”

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car-tire_122438534TSOur February 18, 2014 blog, Massachusetts, Where Only Young Rubber Hits the Road, covered An Act to Increase Road Safety, proposed by the Massachusetts House of Representatives, which was assigned bill tracking number H3016. The Act would require issuance of a rejection certificate for any vehicle equipped with a light-truck or passenger tire, including a full-service spare, more than six years old.
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